Mountainside Launches New Stress Relief Campaign Aimed at College Students

Published on November 4, 2015

Canaan, CT—With the end of the fall semester and final exams quickly approaching, Mountainside focuses its attention on helping prevent drug abuse on college campuses. A growing number of students across the country are resorting to risky solutions to combat exam stress: study drugs. As a part of the nation’s growing prescription drug problem, an estimated 30 percent of college students have used attention deficit /hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications such as Adderall and Ritalin to help them prepare for exams.

College students mistakenly believe that study drugs positively influence grades and academic performance. While these drugs are attractive for their ability to help an individual better focus and concentrate, New Stress Relief Campaign Aimed at College Students students often fail to realize that abusing such drugs pose harmful physical and psychological side effects similar to more feared street drugs. Some of the common side effects are shortness of breath, anxiety, and a fast heartbeat. The more dangerous effects include weakness or numbness in arms or legs, chest pain, seizures, aggressive behavior, paranoia, and long-term harm to the brain. A 2013 SAMHSA report showed that the number of emergency department visits involving ADHD medications among those aged 18 to 25 rose four-fold from 2,131 in 2005 to 8,148 in 2010.

Mountainside seeks to inform college students about the dangers of these drugs and provide healthy stress relieving alternatives. The Stress Buster Kit features playlists, a curated list of apps, a group study guide, yoga poses, guided meditation, and printable coloring sheets to help students de-stress, relax, and focus.

“The Stress Buster Kit is part of Mountainside’s efforts to help stem the tide of drug abuse in our nation by educating teens and young adults about the dangers of experimenting with drugs,” said Executive director Stephen Langley. “Students are under the impression that study drugs are harmless study aids, but in reality, these drugs can cause them to develop detrimental health problems and addictions. We want to provide them with holistic alternatives for coping with their mounting stress, and empower them to live a healthier life.”

The Stress Buster Kit is a part of Mountainside Treatment Center’s #DoesntDefineME campaign, which aims to raise awareness about substance abuse and alcoholism. By encouraging those in recovery to share their stories, #DoesntDefineME shows people with an active addiction that recovery is possible and that addiction doesn’t have to limit a person’s potential.

To learn more about Mountainside’s treatment programs for alcohol and drug abuse, visit www.Mountainside.com.